research topic 17

Scholar-Practitioner Project: Research Topic

Identifying the appropriate dataset to answer your question may pose more challenges than just access to the source. After developing your research question, the first challenge is to find a dataset with enough information to answer that question, even though the dataset might originally have been designed to answer a different question. Working with secondary data will require a judicious analysis of its content, design methods, and validity in order to determine whether it will suit your research needs.

This week, you will select a topic that you would like to research using one or more of the provided data sets.

To prepare:

  • Review this week’s Learning Resources.

Based on the data set you selected and the research topic you proposed in Week 1, submit a 2-page paper that includes the following:

  • An introduction/problem statement on the importance of your research topic as a public health issue. This should be similar to one that you might submit for your doctoral study.
  • Support your response, with a limited review of the current literature (3–5 references).
  • Incorporate your Instructor’s feedback and approval regarding the topic and data set you have chosen.
  • Translate your research topic into research question(s).
  • Use of APA formatting for your paper and citations for your resources

SPP: Association between Income, Age and Education Attainment among Adults in Hawaii.

References

Smith, P. M., Stock, S. R., McLeod, C. B., Koehoorn, M., Marchand, A., & Mustard, C. A. (2010). Research opportunities using administrative databases and existing surveys for new knowledge in occupational health and safety in Canada, Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 101, S46–S52.

Doolan, D. M., & Froelicher, E. S. (2009). Using an existing data set to answer new research questions: A methodological review. Research and Theory for Nursing Practice, 23(3), 203–215.

Fink, A. (2013a). Research design, validity, and best available evidence. In Evidence-based public health practice (pp. 107–158). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

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